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Technology Isn't the Answer to Surviving Digital Disruption Guest post by Charles Araujo, Principal Analyst, Intellyx There's a funny thing about digital transformation: we are simultaneously over-hyping it and understating it. On the one hand, every tech company in the world is talking about it. It doesn't matter how mundane the technology; every company is somehow relating their products to digital transformation. On the other, many people are failing to grasp the import and impact of what digital transformation really means. In far too many cases, business and IT leaders are dismissing it as nothing more than a marketing ploy. The unfortunate result is that the over-hypedness of digital transformation is obscuring its real meaning. This dichotomy is most apparent in what I call the tech company fallacy. Everywhere I turn, I hear another company executive make a procl... (more)

Digital Business Architecture | @CloudExpo #AI #ML #DigitalTransformation

Competitive Value: Unlocking Your Digital Business Architecture Guest post by Charles Araujo, Principal Analyst, Intellyx IT leaders face a monumental challenge. They must figure out how to sort through the cacophony of new technologies, buzzwords, and industry hype to find the right digital path forward for their organizations. And they simply cannot afford to fail. Those organizations that are fastest to the right digital path will be the ones that win. The path forward, however, is strewn with the legacy of decisions made long ago - often before any of the current leadership team assumed their roles. While it's fun to think about the future with a green-field mindset, that's not reality for IT leaders sitting in the trenches. To make matters worse, vendors are bombarding business executives with messages describing an unbridled future full of promise - and profits ... (more)

Tour the #Agile #DigitalTransformation Roadmap | @CloudExpo #IoT #Cloud #DevOps #BigData

Since we launched our Agile Digital Transformation Roadmap poster two weeks ago, several hundred people around the globe have downloaded it - but it's not clear how many of them have taken the time to work their way through it. Haven't seen it yet, you say? No worries - you can download the poster for free at AgileDigitalTransformation.com. OK then - everyone have the poster handy? Good. Here's how to make sense of it. So...Where's the Roadmap? The first thing you'll notice about the ADT Roadmap is that it doesn't look too much like the sort of roadmap you'd likely see in the course of your work. There are no clear starting or ending points, and while the progression generally goes from left to right, there are plenty of branches and backtracks along the way. Welcome to digital transformation, folks! Your transformation will also likely have unclear endpoints, and ... (more)

Making the Digital Enterprise a Reality | @CloudExpo #DigitalTransformation

Guest post by Intellyx Principal Analyst Charles Araujo The reason I believe digital transformation is not only more than a fad, but is actually a life-or-death imperative for every business and IT executive on the planet is simple: there will be no place for an "industrial enterprise" in a digital world. Transformation, by definition, is a metamorphosis from one state to another, wholly new state. As such, a true digital transformation must be the act of transforming an industrial-era organization into something wholly different - the Digital Enterprise. Digital transformation has moved beyond a mere buzzword and is getting harder and harder to dismiss as just another fad. As it is becoming accepted as a business imperative, however, organizations are struggling to understand what it actually means to execute a digital transformation effort. For most people, digita... (more)

The DevOps Virus | @DevOpsSummit #Agile #DevOps #ContinuousDelivery

Whenever the conversation in a large organization circles around to how to be more innovative, someone always brings up a skunkworks. According to Wikipedia, the original Skunk Works is Lockheed Martin's Advanced Development Programs (ADP), responsible for the design of several aircraft - an effort that continues to this day. Over time, however, the term skunkworks has taken on a broader meaning. Innovation thought leader Everett Rogers (the fellow who coined the term early adopter) defined a skunkworks as "an especially enriched environment that is intended to help a small group of individuals design a new idea by escaping routine organizational procedures." Rogers goes on to point out that "the research and development (R&D) workers in a skunkworks are usually specially selected, given special resources, and work on a crash basis to create an innovation." For a la... (more)

Customer Centricity Tips for Digital Transformation | @CloudExpo #Cloud

Seven Extreme Customer Centricity Tips for Digital Transformation One of the most important tenets of digital transformation is that it's customer-driven. In fact, the only reason technology is involved at all is because today's customers demand technology-based interactions with the companies they do business with. It's no surprise, therefore, that we at Intellyx agree with Patrick Maes, CTO, ANZ Bank, when he said, "the fundamental element in digital transformation is extreme customer centricity." So true - but note the insightful twist that Maes added to the customer-driven digital mantra: extreme. In the context of digital transformation, then, what are some examples of customer centricity we would consider to be extreme? Here's our take. Extreme Customer Centricity #1: Ditch the IVR Quick show of hands: who likes interactive voice response (IVR)? You know, "pre... (more)

Seven Extreme Employee Journey Digital Principles | @ThingsExpo #IoT #DigitalTransformation

Digital means customer preferences and behavior are driving enterprise technology decisions to be sure, but let's not forget our employees. After all, when we say customer, we mean customer writ large, including partners, supply chain participants, and yes, those salaried denizens whose daily labor forms the cornerstone of the enterprise. While your customers bask in the warm rays of your digital efforts, are your employees toiling away in the dark recesses of your enterprise, pecking data into arcane screens as they struggle to retain a thread of sanity under the onslaught of management practices from the 1930s? Digital means customer preferences and behavior are driving enterprise technology decisions to be sure, but let's not forget our employees. After all, when we say customer, we mean customer writ large, including partners, supply chain participants, and yes,... (more)

Twitter is the Dumbest Thing I Have Ever Seen in My Life

On December 30, 2008 I was in Prague spending the New Year's Eve. That morning I found a copy of the Financial Times outside my hotel room and read this story during my breakfast, entitled Companies use Twitter to pack PR punch. The story was intriguing and I was curious. When I returned home I opened up a Twitter account, almost two months ago by now. Here is my review and experience with Twitter for the past two months. It is a useless, stupid nightmare. This idiotic Web 2.0 nonsense is crammed with spammers and crazy people who have too much time in their hands, not to mention the occasional hookers here and there who are trying to sneak in with their tweets. Twitter is the dumbest thing I have ever seen, I can't believe my eyes. What is wrong with you people? Did you lose your minds? Get a job, do something, leave this stupidity alone. Now, I have to rescue my ce... (more)

Manager expectations define employee performance

There was a study carried out by psychologists at Minnesota University in 1977 that demonstrated how other people’s expectations of us influence how we behave. It is as if we sub-consciously pick up how others view us and start to behave accordingly. Those of you familiar with the Iceberg Theory from the Governing Change management training program will recognize the first law of the iceberg; “We always influence and there is always a reaction (either conscious or sub-conscious)”. From a management perspective the study supports the fact that our expectations of our employees influence their performance. If we see them as high performing they will be. If we view them as ordinary, they will be. I am a firm believer in ‘People are only as good as they are allowed to be.’ When employees are marked as a 3 out of 5 (which is most of them) in their annual appraisal what i... (more)

Setting the Bar for Agile Architecture

My five months with EnterpriseWeb have run their course, and I’m returning to the world of advisory, analysis, and architecture training with my new company, Intellyx, and this, the inaugural issue of our Cortex newsletter. After a dozen years with ZapThink, doing my best to help organizations around the globe get architecture right, you might wonder why I took a detour as Chief Evangelist for a vendor. The answer: EnterpriseWeb has brought technology to market that can upend the entire Agile Architecture discussion. They have set the bar for what it means to build a platform that can enable organizations to achieve the elusive business agility benefits that SOA promised but never delivered. And if a five-person company out of upstate New York can do that, then anybody can. As of today I return full time to being a chief evangelist for the style of Enterprise Arch... (more)

The Three Dimensions of Digital Diversity By @TheEbizWizard | @DevOpsSummit [#DevOps]

Enterprise IT shops have long struggled with the dual challenges of homogeneity and heterogeneity. Homogeneous environments clearly had appeal: single-vendor shops would gain the benefits of working with one point of contact, and perhaps the various applications and infrastructure components would work together as advertised - or perhaps not. But no one vendor ever had the best of everything, a dismaying fact that led to best of breed strategies: select the app or tool in each category that best met your needs, even though over time, the end result was inevitably a complex hodgepodge. And if something didn't work? All you'd get from the vendors would be fingerpointing. Back and forth the CIO would go, trying to meet the diverse needs of various lines of business while still struggling to get everything to work together. Some would place bets on single vendors, only ... (more)